Mold Maintenance & Repair

OCT 2016

Mold Maintenance & Repair

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6 Mold Maintenance & Repair F E AT U R E Data discipline and employee accountability are required for creating defect targets and goals for all molds. non-standard la non-standard language, which takes longer to decipher, and decipher, and that next technician doesn't get that decipher, and that next technician doesn't get next decipher, and that next technician doesn't get technician decipher, and that next technician doesn't get doesn decipher, and that next technician doesn't get t decipher, and that next technician doesn't get get decipher, and that next technician doesn't get all the data he needs. Next comes counting mouse clicks, a technique used to measure the "cumbersome" level of a maintenance system. For example, the more clicks required before the user is finally able to access the information needed will dictate his or her level of affection for any maintenance program. Also not popular are database crashes and slow-moving systems. Add all these circumstances up, and you can guarantee a fixed-it-type entry on the mainte- nance log. The more clicks necessary, the less the system will be used. We are not trying to discount all the great features that have been added to electronic maintenance systems over the years, but as long as shops are collecting critical mainte- nance core data with free-form text-field brain dumps instead of using standardized shop lan- guage, they will continue to struggle to develop real, measurable metrics and be truly proactive. That is the answer: to develop and use stan- dard terms. Make a list of these terms and hang them up for all to get familiar with and use on a daily basis. It will take a meeting or two among quality staff, the molding manager and the toolroom manager to create terms for the core areas areas, but the time spent but areas, but the time spent the areas, but the time spent time areas, but the time spent spent areas, but the time spent on this will be recouped many times over with more accurate data and the ability to quickly sort and count entries. This This also will require data discipline and also This also will require data discipline and will This also will require data discipline and require This also will require data discipline and data This also will require data discipline and discipline This also will require data discipline and and This also will require data discipline and employee accountability, but it will enable a shop to create defect targets and goals for all molds and take advantage of the accumulative knowledge concerning how its molds run, and what maintenance is required to keep them running reliably and efficiently. The short, but critical list of standard terms includes: • Mold stops (scheduled and unscheduled) • Defect categories and terms (electrical, mechanical, product, process, maintenance and so on) • Tooling terms (horn pins, leader pins, guide bushings, interlocks and son on) • Corrective action terms (replace, clean, rework, fabricate, polish and so on). The tooling and labor costs should be associated with every defect, so a shop knows which defects are costing the most money in corrective-action repairs. Understanding which issues are stopping it from efficiently producing quality parts on time can help a shop to devel- op a list of ongoing targets to post and assign to the repair technicians, as opposed to asking them to fight fires every day. This is what true proactive maintenance is all about. Only when the shop has a better handle on what is stop- LEARN MORE For more from Steve Johnson on mold performance and maintenance issues, visit moldmakingtechnology. com/columns/building-a-better-mold .

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