Mold Maintenance & Repair

OCT 2016

Mold Maintenance & Repair

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October 2016 5 goal of efficiently producing quality parts on time. The bottom line is that molders and molds have problems that will not all be solved through scheduled cleanings. Molds require more attention. So if regular cleanings aren't the answer then what is? The critical ingredient to real improve- ment lies in the ability to accurately monitor and count issues and corrective actions over time, with "time" being mold cycle counts or parts produced. Mold performance does not rely solely on molds being cleaned more often, but on the monitoring of defects and mold issues to create a viable list of targets that users can focus on when molds are taken out for PM. It is imperative for continuous improvement that a shop can determine with relative ease and accuracy its top issues, as there are just too many variables to monitor to be continuously effective. The maintenance strategy must ag- gressively go after production-stopping issues. Where to Start Many times shops want to improve their root- cause analysis when they should first make sure they are chasing the things that are worthy of their time and effort. When a mold lands on a Images courtesy of MoldTrax LLC. Developing and using standard terms for your mold maintenance processes will yield more accurate data and the ability to quickly sort and count entries. bench for PM (or for any reason) repair techni- cians should use that time to utilize and grow the knowledge base about that mold. Part of a reliability-centered maintenance strategy (the process used to determine the most effective maintenance approach or to ensure that systems continue to do what their users require) is iden- tifying issues instead of blindly performing PM without being up to speed on historical problems. Start by developing a list of reasons for mold stops. In a good maintenance system, this will consist of about 30 reasons categorized as "scheduled" or "unscheduled." Shops using standard workorder forms likely have already discovered that the typical work-order head- ing is usually a typed-in statement, as opposed to a standard term. Part of the discipline of documentation is requiring those in charge of creating mold PM or mold workorders to use standard terms that are sortable and measure- able. We just don't use data like we should. For example, when a repair technician types in "fixed it," "done" or "completed" for a corrective-action resolution, this information can be viewed on a global scale, but what does it actually accomplish? You have maintenance confusion on a global scale with time, money and resources wasted on repetitive issues and other defects that slip through the cracks. The flip side of "fixed it" are long, overdetailed ramblings of repair technicians trying to do the best job they can, and give subsequent technicians a complete picture of what maintenance was needed and performed on the mold. The prob- lem lem here often is the lack of clear here lem here often is the lack of clear often lem here often is the lack of clear is lem here often is the lack of clear the lem here often is the lack of clear lack of clear technical writing within these long within technical writing within these long these long stories. They typically are written in ally are written in The critical ingredient to real improvement lies in the ability to accurately monitor and count issues and corrective actions over time, with "time" being mold cycle counts or parts produced.

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